My Memoirs Backstory: My Mama, Esther LeBaron Spencer de McDonald, Pt 10 … (And The Perils of Polygamy)

My Mama, Esther LeBaron Spencer de McDonald, Pt 10 … (And The Perils of Polygamy)

ma sitting, 2 1
Mama, Esther LeBaron Spencer de McDonald, & grandchild

 


 One-of-a-kind: M-O-M
Out of all the Mothers in the world,
you’re one-of-a-kind; 
So thanks, Mom!
No better mama could I find!
Rebecca Germany
and Stephany Spencer


Continuing where I left off in the previous blog discussing “The Perils of Polygamy,” let’s add to this perilous Mormon-fundamentalist doctrine discussion one of its greatest oxymorons:

Child brides and young women are thrown into idealistic polygamous relationships without the least training or preparation for such difficult liaisons! This is one of the worst ingredients in this stressful and volatile plural-marriage-mess-up.

 And once thrown to the pernicious “polygamy wolves,” it’s “Stink, sink, or swim:” They’re eaten alive, then expected to automatically know how to spit up and live polygamy like a saint … though it’s an altogether unfair and unnatural way to live.

Now add to this pernicious, perilous, presumptuous, and preposterous plural-marriage pot the ever-abiding and overriding following foul-smelling, fallacious, and insidious ingredient: These unfortunate “plygs” believe they are Saints –– but they’re not. Now stir!

A mature couple in a monogamous marriage generally has enough trouble making a go of it. When you throw into a nubile polygamous marriage all the ingredients included in the plural-marriage kit (a kit filled with kinks and sticks that wedge themselves into the spokes of the vehicle’s fine tuning) it’s a wonder the volatile wheel can turn at all!

And a wonder the fire of love isn’t put out altogether. Sometimes it is. But often times there was no love, to begin with — just an arranged marriage participated in out of obligation and belief that that’s what God wants.

Add to this boiling brew that Mormon fundamentalists consider themselves “God’s chosen handful.” So they take for granted they should automatically know how to cook it all up — the polygamous soup recipe, that is — perfectly — even though they got no training in the matter of how to cook it — and ain’t no saints!

Now add to this stew that there are no manuals — no recipes written on the subject of how to live the dastardly, difficult life of polygamy — let alone a Dr. Phil to contact for counseling and guidance — no matter how badly a wife, husband, child, and family needs help and advice.

The end result? You have a cesspool of living hell — not harmony. People have to shut off their emotions to survive! To be sure, it’s a life only true Saints could endure or traverse. Yet, fools wade in where angels fear to tread. I know! I’ve been there, done that … and never want to do it again!

So, I feel for my zealous grandmother, grandfather, and his plural wife, Aunt Onie (discussed in previous blogs). They tried so hard to live their Prophet Joseph Smith’s commandment: “Live polygamy or be damned to hell.

Hell?! They were already in hell! They just didn’t know it! Or couldn’t admit it … because it ran against the grain of their religion to think, let alone dare believe such stuff.

Poor miserable Mama! But as in all things in this world, amidst the bad, there’s always some good. And she attests that her childhood “had many wonderful times.” Nonetheless, she grew up in the polygamists’ barbarous, backward lifestyle laden with deprivation and unnecessary dilemmas.

Monogamous mothers and fathers don’t have enough time, money, and attention to give to their children when they have from five to twenty-five babies — or more! — all born within a year or two of each other — as in the case of Mormon fundamentalist families.

So you know the polygamist father of a huge herd of kids ain’t got the wherewithal to give to his flock — including all his wives. Therefore, Mama and her nineteen siblings and half-siblings, plus her mother, father, and his plural wife suffered a lot of needless hell … and they didn’t have to wait “till death do us part.”

Only it’s considered blasphemous, among Mormon fundamentalists, to think this way. They generally wouldn’t dream of thinking the way I now think — though, let me tell you, it’s far from the way I was brought up to think!

Mormon fundamentalists believe they are doing a glorious and blessed thing when they bring all the children they possibly can into “good Mormon fundamentalist families — and harems.” (I mean, it’s literally quantity, not quality!)

After they’ve produced all the kids and wives they possibly can, they all then swim in their surreal soup, surviving only by living in a dream world where they’re cut off from their real feelings and individuality.

This surreal, sanctimonious soup they manage to sip only by keeping a smile on their face, a prayer in their heart … and a tale in their head that they’re “very, very happy, mightily blessed ... and better/ better off than everyone else.”

It’s a rather ridiculous but rewarding tale; one that assures them they’re going to the highest degree of glory, once they die (the women on their husband’s shirt tails, no less!) … because they lived polygamy and also had all the kids they possibly could.” (All that matters to most Mormon fundamentalists is how many wives and children they have!)

They’re so misled … and reason even less. The truth is pretty much the opposite of what they believe. But they’re taught to follow their patriarchal leaders … not to use their head or heart.

They’re commonly told: “When your leader speaks, your thinking has been done.” And they’re admonished to sacrifice in this life … and live for the hereafter. (Life’s too miserable to live for the here-‘n’-now!)

Living in this illusion — this delusion — they have no idea what real attention and love is.  Nor are they prepared to do as well nor have as good a life as they might have had were they raised normally; i.e., if they were raised to fit into our modern world … not a fastidious foot-washing fantasy.

Sadly, in their religious fanaticism, they pass their masochistic, ignorant, depraved and deprived lifestyle on, generation after generation — a secluded, backward, and lawless lifestyle that perpetrates and perpetuates polygamy and huge progenies of neglected and abused children.

What’s worse, in the name of religious freedom, these children born in the United States to one man and his multiple wives are children born without the protection and rights the rest of America’s children are born with. (That’s another story, but I’ve discussed it, somewhat, in earlier blogs.)

Suffice it to say, “Plural marriage” is nothing but an illegal, insensitive, narcissistic, and irresponsible lifestyle generated by Joe Smith, an uneducated, sense-of-entitlement, self-proclaimed prophet … a “prophet” there for the “profit,” power, and prestige!

Continued in: “My Memoirs Backstory: My Mama, Esther LeBaron Spencer de McDonald, Pt 11 … And The Perils of Polygamy”

2 thoughts on “My Memoirs Backstory: My Mama, Esther LeBaron Spencer de McDonald, Pt 10 … (And The Perils of Polygamy)

  1. I have read a little. And I don’t like the way you talk fir my aunt Esther. She was a well educated woman. She didn’t speak like a hillbilly. It’s hard to read thru it. I loved that woman very much. She was my fairy mother. I was born on her birthday. Other than that. It was good.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Glorianna, thank you so much for your feedback. It’s very important to me. I know Mother went to college and improved herself a lot, graduating around age sixty or so with a degree in Journalism. Much reading also improves one’s vocabulary and more formal English usage.

      However, when I was growing up with her, she definitely spoke what you call “Hillbilly lingo” — as did her siblings, my siblings and I, Grandma Maud — and many others who lived in our vicinity.

      Once I started college to get a Teaching Credential, I had to work hard, myself, to overcome that type of sloppy enunciation, and incorrect English usage we spoke, at times (Because the way a teacher speaks is very important: The teacher’s language is imitated by the children. And speaking good English is important to children’s success in the job world, as well as in their upward mobility.)

      If she no longer spoke less-than-perfect/ Down-home country English, that’s interesting.

      I may consider upgrading her diction and verb usage, etc., therefore — for I do know using accents, colloquialisms, etc., is hard to read.

      I’m trying to depict a certain scene and setting I grew up with. I’m aware I probably offend some of my readers; yet, I must also “shoot from the hip” … and tell my truth: Too many untruths were told me as I grew up!

      I would very much appreciate your feedback, in the future, should you find me seemingly incorrect in anything I write, for, as I mentioned in one of my blogs, I saw little if any of my mother after 1967 when I fled the cult.

      Like

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